Wait until next year

Putting off what could be done tomorrow, today

Vanity – Don’t Be Shy

Album cover of Vanity - Don't Be Shy

I like bands that make music to watch drinks by. Drinking Music. I don’t even think you have to drink to it, but it has that kind of feel. And there are two kinds of Drinking Music. There is the music to wallow by. The music that transports you to a bar stool, nursing a whisky, wondering where it all went wrong. Then there is the other kind of Drinking Music. The kind that transports you to that place two drinks in where the worries of the world are fading and you start to feel like you can take on that same world and feel a little less alone within it too. Read the rest of this entry »

Taking a look at the new MLB pop-up store in London

Exterior of MLB pop-up in London

This lunchtime I went for a walk to Long Acre in Covent Garden to have a mooch around the brand new pop-up store dedicated to everything Major League Baseball. Read the rest of this entry »

Back of a fag packet analysis of the proposals for new Parliamentary constituency boundaries in Bexley

View from Erith Pier

There could be some notable changes to who represents Bexley’s residents in Parliament under new proposals from the Boundary Commission. I am no political commentator or analyst, but their Initial proposals for new Parliamentary constituency boundaries in London make for some interesting reading. Read the rest of this entry »

Happy Birthday to The Penny Farthing

Sixth Sense jazz band playing at The Penny Farthing micropub

Saturday saw the second anniversary celebrations of Crayford’s micropub, The Penny Farthing. In two years the pub has gathered both awards and a band of loyal drinkers. It is all well deserved. The pub, based on the simple concept of serving well-kept beer in a pleasant environment, is a wonderful place to drink. They just get it when it comes to what makes going to the pub brilliant. Read the rest of this entry »

Easier to clean up the mess

Suburban streets and a large cemetery, viewed from the air

“It has been established, for example, that suburban streets all over America ought to be as wide as two-lane county highways, regardless of whether this promotes driving at excessive speeds where children play, or destroys the spatial relationship between the houses on the street. Back in the 1950s, when these formulas were devised, the width of residential streets was tied closely to the idea of a probable nuclear war with the Russians. And in the aftermath of a war, it was believed, wide streets would make it easier to clean up the mess with heavy equipment.”

The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America’s Man-made Landscape by James Howard Kunstler

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