Wait until next year

Putting off what could be done tomorrow, today

Category: architecture

10

Forum Romanum, for Mr Soane’s Museum

What they say of troubles, that they never come alone, might also be said of the passions. They arrive together, like the Muses or the Furies.

François-René de Chateaubriand, Memoirs from Beyond the Grave

I recently made my way around Sir John Soane’s Museum, the house of the 19th century architect, left untouched since his death. Rather than the curation you would see in a normal museum, I encountered the curation of a home, of a man. Soane was a collector, of art, artefacts, the esoteric. He was also a creator, and so the home is full of his follies and innovations, architecturally and thematically. Read the rest of this entry »

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The shortcut

Flowers in the grounds of a church

I had not long stepped off the airplane. My ears were still popping, a release of pressure, a rush of clarity of sound. My body was still braced for turbulence. My brain was still telling my body that bracing yourself in such situations won’t do you much good. Here I was walking over the ground I was an hour earlier flying over, descending towards. Read the rest of this entry »

The same thing

Blurred shadow of dirigible, zeppelin

I spend too much time looking at commons images. The images you can use and share without worrying about copyright or payment. They can improve a piece of writing and can sometimes offer an inspiration. They are generally one of the internet’s better rabbit holes, a glimpse into the past but also an alternate history, a motley collection of professional and amateur photography, strange illustrations from stranger books, carvings, engravings, lithographs, screengrabs. A world once there, a world gone, a world never known about.

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Grainger Market

The other day I found myself in Newcastle with a little time to kill, so made my way to Grainger Market. Read the rest of this entry »

Easier to clean up the mess

Suburban streets and a large cemetery, viewed from the air

“It has been established, for example, that suburban streets all over America ought to be as wide as two-lane county highways, regardless of whether this promotes driving at excessive speeds where children play, or destroys the spatial relationship between the houses on the street. Back in the 1950s, when these formulas were devised, the width of residential streets was tied closely to the idea of a probable nuclear war with the Russians. And in the aftermath of a war, it was believed, wide streets would make it easier to clean up the mess with heavy equipment.”

The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America’s Man-made Landscape by James Howard Kunstler

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